Presentations

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Mary-Lou Harry
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Betsy Imgs
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Mr Roberts Orya

The elevation of the Republic’s Maritime Agenda to the high table of national discourse has become a matter so pressing that its absence from national economic planning and repositioning can no longer continue to form part of “corridor talk” but must be opened up to a national dialogue with very decisive intentions and implementable outcomes. To this end I wish to congratulate the SAMSA Chairperson of the Board of Directors and the CEO for putting together the inaugural South Africa Maritime Industry Conference (SAMIC) that is scheduled to take place on 04 – 06 July 2012, at the CTICC, under the theme, that call us into action.

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Cindy Stoltz

"BUILDING THE PIPELINE " We at Magsaysay have come to realize that a seafarer with the proficiency, skills, and knowledge suitable for the job does not come to your door step looking for work. You may need to poach in order to catch him. From our own experience, especially with the prevalence of poaching during shipping’s boom years, we recognize that concentrating on the present pool is not enough. We need to build the pipeline and building that pipeline is a critical strategy in having a continuous supply of qualified maritime personnel

Mr. Marlon Rono

As far as South Africa is concerned, one often underestimates the degree to which our history has been shaped by the seas that surround us to the east, south and west. On the one hand, for the continent‟s inhabitants who, in successive waves and over centuries, made their way from the north across hills and plains, the Cape was the end of the road. On the other hand, for peoples outside, the Cape was the long eluding door to the alluring world of the exotic ocean that lies around its forbidding shores.

What is often overlooked is the centrality of the sea in the colonial enterprise or, in other words, the extent to which colonial power rested more on the control of the seas than on the control of the colonies themselves.